I'm Not a Mac, but I'm Certainly Not PC

August 11, 2012   10:05 pm

Via Neal Boortz

Did Bob Costas really refer to a black European Olympics medalist as an “African-American?” What kind of mindless politically correct stupidity is that?

And while we’re on the subject, if an “African-American” who is actually from the United States wins a medal, how do the Olympics officials decide which African country gets to share the credit for that medal? Just wondering.

Still more … if an African-American wins a gold medal, what national anthem do they play? Have they created some kind of medley?

One of the funniest things I remember was hearing someone referring to a person from Africa as an “African-American African.” It certainly does seem that, when exposed to global culture, the American PC-ese seems to range from misguided to offensive. The same people who cry the loudest over discrimination over ethnic origin are also the same people who make sure we can’t look past ethnic origin, thereby making all people equal.

Somewhere, we seem to have swallowed whole the lie that what someone else says about us has to be true. If someone calls you ugly, are you ugly? If someone calls you mean, are you mean? If things worked like that, I’d just pay someone to call me a 6-foot, 3-inch Harrison Ford look-a-like!

Now, I’m not ignoring our country’s trouble past when it comes to true equality, but I’m also not convinced that affirmative action and political correctness have gotten us any closer to that equality. To suggest that someone be color-blind is ridiculous; on the other hand, differences are not generally liabilities. This infatuation with words, though, is a trickier thing. Freedom of speech is important, as evidenced by its being enshrined as Article 1 in the Bill of Rights, yet political correctness is the complete opposite of this. If jerks are not allowed to say jerky things, how do you know who the jerks are? I’m certainly not advocating being personally offensive to another individual; there are standards of decorum, manners, and courtesy for that. (See “jerk” in the prior sentence.) Hate speech, political speech, religious speech - it’s all speech, and it gives the hearer an idea of what is in the speakers’ heart.

And then - if a violation of the PC speech codes occurs, we get the calls for an apology. This, too, violates the principles of free speech; how “free” is speech that is demanded? If the offended party were to simply register their offense, then if the offending party cared that they had been offensive, they could choose to offer an apology. When was the last time you heard a demanded apology that was worth the time it took to listen to it? “I’m sorry IF you got offended by what I said” - that’s not an apology for saying the words, it’s an apology for the offense! It’s almost like we’re still in grade school. “Now, say you’re sorry, Timmy…”

I also worry about generations reared with this viewpoint; if we’re not tough enough to withstand words that we don’t like, how in the world are we going to face down real evil? I believe there is a better way to handle that. If the words bother you, determine why they bother you; are they offensive words, do they point out your shortcomings, etc. Once you determine the source of the offense, you will know if you are dealing with a “the truth hurts” scenario, a “this person is a jerk” scenario, or a “that was unfair / inaccurate” scenario. You can then ignore the speech, change your ways, or register your offense, and move on. It’s a much more productive way to deal with words that tried to hurt you.

I’ll wrap up with this; if you regularly hear “racist dog-whistles” coming from your opponents, your opponents likely aren’t the problem.

Categorized   Freedom of Speech     Race     Social Issues    

Tagged    affirmative action     african     american     apology     bill of rights     black     bob costas     harrison ford     neal boortz     olympics     political correctness     racism     words